Straight Talk by Roy Moraleta
Straight Talk

Duterte’s politics and Pacman’s game

Jul 22, 2021, 12:04 AM
Roy Moraleta

Roy Moraleta

Columnist

HE would not be booted out easily from his biggest dream yet. However misguided he may have become in his style of politics, his intrinsic tendency to triumph could be the engine behind his aggressive propel towards the highly spirited, greatly complicated and certainly costly and messy world of Philippine politics.

Perhaps, the man has unmindfully thought that politics is no different from the trade he has the penchant for winning. Hence, to hell with them who belittle his myopic and juvenile political prowess, or so his friends would dare attempt to brand him.

After all, the man has proven with success that he can have all he thought he must have, at whatever cost, including a baccalaureate degree he never had the chance to get during his supposedly school years, but which he easily snatched in just three or 16 months?

The Pac-man has been winning battles, if so, why not politics, too? Why not the presidency? After all, he may have the purist of breed and the profundity in heart he thought this country needs. “Hindi talino, kundi puso,” or so he claimed. Since he had already won a national election, he has concluded that he got the winning cards.

But the frivolity of his understanding in what I believe is most complex of a calling as the presidency is evident. His unrestrained haste in responding to messy issues could be a clue to his immaturity in the game of Philippine politics. Hopefully, his tirades against President Duterte, an ex-friend of his and unfortunately, a popular president, are propped with solid evidence.

Otherwise, his loss could be eminent even at the very outset of political positioning this early. Pacman should not have equaled politics to his game of professional boxing. While the two contests are either won or lost through a fight, they are world apart for an analogy.

In politics, you do not have to win an election by throwing punches at your opponent, as in boxing. You get to win an election by drawing the greatest number of fans and chants out of a crowding political and voting audience. Unlike in boxing, the chanting crowd decides who wins an election.


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